Farm & Agriculture

Princesse Charlene de Monaco
This nobly named hybrid tea rose produces such petal-packed blooms that they could be mistaken for light pink peonies. But these flowers have a strong, unmistakably rosy scent, which earned this variety the fragrance award for 2020. The 5-foot-tall plant blooms from spring to fall and has excellent...
My grandkids and I have a tradition at my house of paddling around the edge of our pond in a pirogue. All of them started when they were one year old or so. As they have grown, they have progressed from just sitting between my knees and observing to now trying to catch bugs and frogs with their...
This orange goo is a fungus that can be found growing on trees and other plants. Photo courtesy Twitter user @swt_karoline.
Some Missouri trees are producing a gooey, orange slime that seeps and grows. Bright orange tree slime brings wonder to the woods after cool, wet spring days, says University of Missouri Extension horticulturist Tamra Reall. This slime from Mother Nature grows from a number of fungi, including...
Poison hemlock. Photo by Tiia Monto, CC-BY-SA-3.0.
Poison hemlock, a poisonous plant that can cause death in livestock, is especially toxic in spring, says Gatlin Bunton, University of Missouri Extension field specialist in agronomy. It can also cause birth defects in the offspring of pregnant animals. Poison hemlock usually grows in ditches,...
While COVID-19 remains in the front of everyone’s mind, the coming of mosquito season means that both people and livestock are vulnerable to other serious illnesses if the farm infrastructure is not sound. Mosquitoes can transmit a number of diseases, including dengue, malaria, yellow fever, Zika...
Source: William Wiebold, 573-673-4128 (cell); 573-882-0621; Greg Luce, 573-473-7079 COLUMBIA, Mo. – As rain pushes corn planting season back yet again, farmers may be better off sticking with poor stands than replanting, says University of Missouri Extension agronomist Bill Wiebold. Farmers face...
The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted supply chains for all kinds of consumer goods. The first signs of trouble appeared in the form of empty shelving where toilet paper formerly sat. Soon to follow were paper towels, bleach and all manner of cleaning supplies. A few stores ran short on milk and...
True armyworm have begun their march across Missouri and producers should scout often, says University of Missouri Extension state field crops entomologist Kevin Rice. MU Extension agronomists reported seeing them in southern Missouri pastures during the group’s weekly teleconference report on May...
Intense or recurrent rainfall creates the potential for damage from ponding, saturated soils and flooding for corn and soybean crops, says University of Missouri Extension agronomist Bill Wiebold. Some parts of southern Missouri have received 25-30 inches of precipitation since the beginning of the...
In response to the tremendous interest in home food production, University of Missouri Extension now offers a free online course in basic vegetable gardening. “The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has put an added financial strain on many Missouri families,” said MU Extension horticulturist David...

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The Caldwell County News

101 South Davis
P.O. Box 218
Hamilton, MO 64644
Phone: 816-583-2116
news@mycaldwellcounty.com

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